Emotion and Symptom-Focused Engagement Trial for Individuals With Acute Leukemia

Official Title

Emotion and Symptom-Focused Engagement (EASE): A Multi-Site Randomized Controlled Trial of an Intervention for Individuals With Acute Leukemia

Summary:

The purpose of this study is to find out whether a novel manualized intervention, called Emotion and Symptom-focused Engagement (EASE), that combines psychological support with symptom screening plus triggered referral to early palliative care for symptom control, reduces psychological distress and physical symptom burden in individuals newly diagnosed with acute leukemia. To do this, half of the participants in this study will receive the usual care offered to patients with acute leukemia and half of the participants will receive usual care plus the EASE intervention.

Trial Description

Primary Outcome:

  • Assess the effect of the EASE intervention compared to usual care to reduce traumatic stress symptoms using the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction questionnaire (SASRQ)
  • Assess the effect of the EASE intervention compared to usual care to reduce physical symptom severity using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS)
Secondary Outcome:
  • Assess the effect of the EASE intervention compared to usual care to reduce traumatic stress symptoms using the SASRQ
  • Assess the effect of the EASE intervention to usual care to reduce physical symptom severity using the MSAS
  • Assess the effect of the EASE intervention compared to usual care on the number of participants meeting criteria consistent with a diagnosis of ASD and threshold ASD based on DSM-5 criteria using the SASRQ
  • Assess the effect of the EASE intervention compared to usual care on Quality of Life using The Functional Assessment of chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-being Scale
  • Assess the effect of the EASE intervention compared to usual care on depressive symptoms using The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9)
  • Assess the effect of the EASE intervention compared to usual care on the number of physical symptoms of cancer and the associated symptom-related distress as measured by the (MSAS)
  • Assess the effect of the EASE intervention compared to usual care on patient satisfaction with care using the 16-item FAMCAR-P16
  • Assess the effect of the EASE intervention compared to usual care on pain using the modified Brief Pain Inventory-Sort Form (BPI)
  • The modified brief Experiences in Close Relationships Scale (ECR-M16) is an instrument to measure attachment security or the ability to rely on close others for support when distressed.
  • 10) The EQ-5D-5L will be used to measure generic health status so that it can be used to compute quality-adjusted life years (QALY) in an economic evaluation that compares the benefit and cost of the EASE intervention
  • To compare progression-free survival between treatment arms
The standard or usual care treatment for patients with newly diagnosed acute leukemia involves admission to hospital for treatment (e.g. induction chemotherapy). Additional support services may be delivered if requested or if a doctor thinks it is necessary. Little research has been done looking at the psychological and physical consequences of being diagnosed with and treated for acute leukemia, but our research team has found that a significant number of these individuals experience symptoms of traumatic stress and severe physical symptoms. Even less research has been done looking at ways to help alleviate this psychological and physical distress. Emotion and Symptom-focused Engagement (EASE) is an integrated psychosocial and early palliative care (symptom control) intervention designed to reduce psychological distress and physical symptom burden in patients newly diagnosed with acute leukemia. The EASE intervention provides i) tailored supportive psychotherapy (called EASE-psy) during the initial weeks of treatment to reduce symptoms of traumatic stress, and ii) symptom screening during the initial inpatient treatment period with triggered referral to early palliative care (symptom control) to help manage moderate to severe physical symptoms (called EASE-phys). A phase II trial of EASE in patients with newly diagnosed acute leukemia demonstrated feasibility and preliminary evidence that it reduces psychological distress and physical symptom severity compared to usual care. This new trial is a definitive phase III, multi-site randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of EASE at reducing psychological distress and physical burden.

View this trial on ClinicalTrials.gov

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Resources

Canadian Cancer Society

These resources are provided in partnership with the Canadian Cancer Society