3TMPO (Triple-Tracer Strategy Against Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Official Title

Triple-tracer Molecular Imaging Using 18F-FDG, 68Ga-PSMA and 68Ga-OCTREOTATE to Characterize Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer (mCRPC) and Evaluate Eligibility for Radionuclide Therapies

Summary:

Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common solid organ cancer in North American men. Patients becoming refractory to loco-regional therapy receive androgen deprivation therapy, but their disease will inevitably progress to metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Treatment failure and poor progression-free survival could be explained by the fact that PCa metastases in the same patient may be polyclonal, showing opposite responses to systemic therapies. This project aims to recruit 100 patients with mCRPC in order to determine the prevalence of intrapatient intermetastasis polyclonality and NED using PET/CT triple-tracer PSMA/FDG/OCTREOTATE imaging and eligibility for either PSMA or OCTREOTATE radioligand therapy (RLT).

Trial Description

Primary Outcome:

  • Polyclonality
  • Neuroendocrine lesion
  • Eligible patients for PSMA-RLT or OCTREOTATE-RLT
Secondary Outcome:
  • 18F-FDG, 68Ga-PSMA and 68Ga-OCTREOTATE positive lesions
  • histologic NED status of lesions
  • Pain score
  • Physical function
  • Disease-associated symptoms
  • PET-tracer uptake derived parameters
Introduction: Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common solid organ cancer in North American men. Patients becoming refractory to loco-regional therapy receive androgen deprivation therapy, but their disease will inevitably progress to metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Of the five treatments approved for mCRPC patients, none has been shown to increase median overall survival beyond 4.8 months. Treatment failure and poor progression-free survival could be explained by the fact that PCa metastases in the same patient may be polyclonal, showing opposite responses to systemic therapies. Indeed, neuroendocrine differentiation from adenocarcinoma is often reported in metastatic PCa, which is associated with increased disease aggressiveness. Currently, no molecular tools are available to follow non-invasively mCRPC transdifferentiation and diagnose patients with neuroendocrine and/or polyclonal PCa. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a promising type of imaging using radio-labeled tracers to specifically identify tumour cells. Hypothesis: The hypothesis of the 3TMPO clinical study is that the prevalence of intrapatient intermetastasis polyclonality can be diagnosed by combining 18F-FDG to other specific PET tracers that have the ability to non-invasively differentiate CRPC adenocarcinoma (CRPC-Adeno) (68Ga-PSMA) from neuroendocrine CRPC (CRPC-NE) tumours (68Ga-OCTREOTATE). Objectives: The study objectives are to determine, in mCRPC patients, the prevalence of intrapatient intermetastasis polyclonality and NED using PET/CT triple tracer PSMA/FDG/OCTREOTATE imaging and their eligibility for radioligand therapy (RLT). Method: This multicentre observational clinical study, for which prevalence of intrapatient intermetastasis polyclonality was set as the primary outcome, will recruit 100 mCRPC patients at 5 different sites across the province of Québec. 68Ga-PSMA and 18F-FDG PET scans will be performed on all enrolled patients, while 68Ga-OCTREOTATE will be performed on those presenting at least one PSMA-negative/FDG-positive lesion. The uptake of each individual lesion will be assessed for each PET tracer and patients with lesions presenting discordant uptake profiles will be considered as having polyclonal disease. OCTREOTATE-positivity will confirm the presence of CRPC-NE. PSMA or OCTREOTATE positivity of all lesions (or at least those with FDG uptake) will determine the eligibility for PSMA and OCTREOTATE RLT, respectively. Relevance: Paradigm-shifting diagnostic and therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to improve the survival of patients with PCa and to deepen our understanding of mCRPC progression.

View this trial on ClinicalTrials.gov

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Resources

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