Hypovolemic Phlebotomy to Reduce Blood Transfusions in Major Hepatic Resections

Official Title

PRICE 2: A Phase 3 Randomized Controlled Trial of Phlebotomy Resulting in Controlled Hypovolemia to Prevent Blood Loss in Major Hepatic Resections

Summary:

Major liver resection is associated with substantial intraoperative blood loss and subsequently blood transfusions. Blood transfusion in elective liver surgery is a significant factor of perioperative morbidity and mortality, as well as possibly long-term oncologic outcome. The purpose of this study is to use whole blood phlebotomy to decrease the central venous pressure, resulting in a state of relative hypovolemia. It is hypothesized that this intervention will lead to a decrease in blood loss at the time of liver resection and thus reduced blood transfusion in major liver surgeries.

Trial Description

Primary Outcome:

  • Packed Red Blood Cell Transfusion Rates
Secondary Outcome:
  • Blood product transfusion rates
  • Intraoperative blood loss
  • Perioperative morbidity and mortality
  • Changes in physiologic parameters (Central Venous Pressure)
  • Changes in physiologic parameters (Pulse Pressure Variation)
Major liver resection is associated with significant intraoperative blood loss and blood transfusions. Blood transfusion in elective liver surgery is a key determinant of perioperative morbidity and mortality, as well as possibly long-term oncologic outcome. Whole blood phlebotomy is a simple intervention, whose aim is to decrease the central venous pressure yielding a state of relative hypovolemia and thus lead to decreased blood loss and subsequently blood transfusion. Small studies, mostly from the liver transplant literature, would suggest that phlebotomy with controlled hypovolemia can result in decreased blood loss and blood transfusion. Since blood loss is an important issue in liver surgery, and the benefits of phlebotomy and controlled hypovolemia are unknown in liver resection patients, a rigorously conducted trial in a representative population of patients undergoing liver resection is warranted, and feasible. In this proposal, it is hypothesized that by the use of hypovolemic phlebotomy, it is possible to decrease blood loss and blood transfusions. To test this hypothesis the investigators plan to randomly allocate participants to hypovolemic phlebotomy plus standard of care or to standard of care. Participants will be those patients undergoing elective major liver resection at The Ottawa Hospital, le Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, and le Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Sherbrooke for any indication. The primary outcome will be red blood cells transfusion up to 30 days following surgery. Secondary outcomes will include intraoperative blood loss, other blood product transfusion requirements, perioperative morbidity and mortality, safety, physiologic parameters, and feasibility elements. A total of 440 patients will be randomized across the 3 sites in Ontario and Quebec. The efficacy of phlebotomy in terms of blood loss and transfusion prevention will be assessed.

View this trial on ClinicalTrials.gov

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Resources

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