ASA in Prevention of Ovarian Cancer (STICs and STONEs)

Official Title

A Randomized Phase II Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Acetylsalicylic Acid (ASA) in Prevention of Ovarian Cancer in Women With BRCA 1/2 Mutations (STICs and STONEs)

Summary:

While ASA is not a cancer medication, research suggests that taking ASA reduces the probability of getting many types of cancer because of its anti-inflammatory action. Inflammation in the ovaries during ovulation is thought to contribute to the development of ovarian cancer, and, because ASA is an anti-inflammatory medication, it may help to prevent it.

Trial Description

Primary Outcome:

  • Proportion of pre- & malignant lesions found during prophylactic risk reduction surgery using a stratified Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test
Secondary Outcome:
  • Acceptance of the ASA intervention from the self-report Credibility/Expectancy Questionnaire
  • Compliance of taking ASA by serum monitoring
The standard or usual treatment for women with a high risk gene mutation, BRCA1 or BRCA2, is to have risk-reducing surgery to remove the fallopian tubes and ovaries (bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy or bilateral salpingectomy inclusive of fimbria) after they have decided not to have more children naturally. Acetylsalicylic Acid (ASA) is a safe, well tolerated drug taken by mouth. ASA has been available for over 100 years and has been used mainly to relieve fever and pain, but also as an anti-inflammatory medication in order to reduce inflammation (swelling).

View this trial on ClinicalTrials.gov

Interested in this trial?

Print this page and take it to your doctor to discuss your eligibilty and treatment options. Only your doctor can refer you to a clinical trial.

Resources

Canadian Cancer Society

These resources are provided in partnership with the Canadian Cancer Society