Low-Flow vs. High-Flow Nasal Cannula for Hypoxemic Immunocompromised Patients During Diagnostic Bronchoscopy

Official Title

Low-Flow vs. High-Flow Nasal Cannula for Hypoxemic Immunocompromised Patients During Diagnostic Bronchoscopy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Summary:

Pneumonia is a lung infection. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy is a test to diagnose the type of lung infection. While this procedure is being performed, a small amount of oxygen is delivered into the nose (low flow nasal cannula). Occasionally during this procedure, the blood oxygen of the patient may drop and an intervention such as increasing the oxygen flow, or placing the patient on a breathing machine is required. An alternative device called 'Optiflow' can provide high flow oxygen through nasal cannula, and is comfortable for patients. If Optiflow is used during bronchoscopy, it may prevent the blood oxygen from dropping.

Trial Description

Primary Outcome:

  • Desaturation during FOB
Pneumonia is a lung infection that is a common complication in people with cancer, because of a weak immune system. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy is a test that is commonly used to help doctors diagnose the type of lung infection and treat it appropriately. It involves passing a thin tube with a camera at the end inside the lungs, and taking some fluid samples which are sent for analysis. While this procedure is being performed, a small amount of oxygen is delivered into the nose (low flow nasal cannula). Occasionally during this procedure, the blood oxygen of the patient may drop (even if the patient is receiving oxygen, and especially if the patient has severe pneumonia), and the procedure may have to be interrupted or prematurely stopped. If the oxygen level drops significantly, an intervention such as increasing the oxygen flow, or in the worst-case scenario temporarily placing the patient on a breathing machine is required. An alternative device called 'Optiflow' can provide high flow oxygen through nasal cannula, and is comfortable for patients. Optiflow was approved by Health Canada in 2006, and is commonly used in hospitals in Ontario and around the world to support patients whose blood oxygen is low. If Optiflow is used during bronchoscopy, it may prevent the blood oxygen from dropping.

View this trial on ClinicalTrials.gov

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Resources

Canadian Cancer Society

These resources are provided in partnership with the Canadian Cancer Society