In the Era of the HPV Vaccine, What Are The Current HPV Subtypes Contributing to High Grade Cervical Dysplasia, Adenocarcinoma in Situ, and Early Cervical Cancer?

Official Title

HSIL/ACIS/Early Cervical Cancer: What Are The Current Causative HPV Subtypes in the Era of HPV Vaccination?

Summary:

This study will look at cervical tissue samples in women with abnormal cervical cells to see if the frequency of the HPV 16/18 subtypes has changed in female populations today, after the introduction of the HPV vaccine. It will compare women who have been exposed to the HPV vaccine with those who have not.

Trial Description

Primary Outcome:

  • Overall prevalence of HPV subtypes
  • Reasons for vaccine failures
The development of cervical dysplasia (precursor to cervical cancer) and cervical cancer requires infection with one of several cancer causing subtypes of the human papilloma virus (HPV). There are over 100 subtypes of HPV, and most are not cancer causing. In the past, North American data has shown that 70% of early cervical cancers were associated with HPV subtypes 16 and/or 18. The first HPV vaccines to be approved protected against the common subtypes of HPV 16 and 18. The traditional HPV vaccination consists of 3-doses administered over a 6 month period. Since the 8 years after the introduction of the vaccine, there have not been any studies analyzing HPV subtype changes. It is important to determine if the prevalence of the HPV subtypes associated with precancerous and/or early cervical cancer have changed, and what preventative outcomes have arisen from the HPV vaccination. This will have implications regarding the importance and anticipated effects of immunization with the nanovalent vaccine that includes other oncogenic subtypes. This study will look at tissue samples to see if the frequency of the HPV 16/18 subtypes has changed in female populations today, after the introduction of the HPV vaccine. It will compare women who have been exposed to the HPV vaccine with those who have not.

View this trial on ClinicalTrials.gov

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Resources

Canadian Cancer Society

These resources are provided in partnership with the Canadian Cancer Society