Durvalumab and Tremelimumab in Patients With Advanced Rare Tumours

Official Title

A Phase II Study of Durvalumab and Tremelimumab in Patients With Advanced Rare Tumours

Summary:

The standard or usual treatment for this disease may be chemotherapy or other types of treatment to slow the spread of the disease and relieve some symptoms of this cancer.

Trial Description

Primary Outcome:

  • Objective response rate measured by RECIST version 1.1
Secondary Outcome:
  • Number and severity of adverse events
  • Time to progression based on Kaplan-Meier method
  • Progression free survival based on Kaplan-Meier method
  • Response duration , based on Kaplan-Meier method
Durvalumab is a new type of drug for many types of cancer. Laboratory tests show that it works by allowing the immune system to detect cancer and stimulate the immune response. This may help to slow down the growth of cancer or may cause cancer cells to die. Durvalumab has been shown to shrink tumours in animals and has been studied in 1733 people and seems promising but it is not clear if it can offer better results than standard treatment alone. Tremelimumab is a new type of drug for various types of cancers. It works in a similar way to durvalumab and may improve the effect of durvalumab. This may also help slow the growth of the cancer cells or may cause cancer cells to die. Tremelimumab has been shown to shrink tumours in animals and has been studied in 1223 people and seems promising but it is not clear if it can offer better results than standard treatment alone when used with durvalumab Combinations of durvalumab and tremelimumab have also been studied and when combined have been shown to increase tumour shrinkage in animals compared to either drug alone. While the combination has been studied in 217 people, it is not clear if it can offer better results than standard treatment.

View this trial on ClinicalTrials.gov

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Resources

Canadian Cancer Society

These resources are provided in partnership with the Canadian Cancer Society