Near-Infrared Fluorescence Guided Robotic Pulmonary Segmentectomy for Early Stage Lung Cancer

Official Title

Near-Infrared Fluorescence Guided Robotic Pulmonary Segmentectomy for Early Stage Lung Cancer: Analysis of Accuracy and Added Value

Summary:

Lungs are made up of individual lobes. When a lung cancer tumour is detected in one of these lobes, surgeons typically perform a Lobectomy. A Lobectomy is the surgery most commonly done to treat early-stage lung cancer and requires removal of an entire lobe of the lung, which removes a large amount of lung tissue For patients with small tumours saving as much healthy lung tissue as possible is important. Each lobe of the lung has smaller sections called segments. When a lung cancer is in one of these segments, it is possible to remove that segment, without removing the entire lobe. This surgery is called a segmentectomy. Compared to a lobectomy, a segmentectomy saves a larger amount of healthy lung tissue. With the advances in screening technology for lung cancer tumours, an increasing amount of very small lung cancer tumours are being found, and the demand for segmentectomy is increasing. A segmentectomy is a hard surgery to perform robotically because it is difficult to view the tissue lines that separate each segment within the lobe. As a result, it is difficult for the surgeon to see exactly which pieces of tissue should be removed. Because of these challenges, many patients having robotic surgery will have a lobectomy, even if a full lobectomy is not needed. Near-Infrared Fluorescence (NIF) using indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent dye is a recent advancement in the robotic platform of robotic surgery. The surgeon will view the CT scan to determine which segment the tumour is located in. Once identified, the surgeon will isolate the segment by cutting off the blood supply to that segment. Then ICG will be injected into a vein. It is expected that the entire lung, except the isolated segment, which will remain 'dark' as it was isolated from blood supply, will fluoresce, giving off a green hue when viewed with the da Vinci Firefly camera. The surgeon will identify 'dark' segment, and will remove it. A pathologist will examine the excised tissue to ensure that the tumour was removed in its entirety. Once confirmed, the surgeon will end the procedure. If the pathologist determines that the segment removed did not contain the entire tumour, then the surgeon will perform a routine lobectomy. This ensures patient safety and confirms that all participants will have the entire tumour removed from their lung.

Trial Description

Primary Outcome:

  • Feasibility of using NIF-guidance in robotic pulmonary segmentectomy for early-stage lung cancer will be evaluated using items 1, 2, and 3 of a 7-item binary rating scale. An score of 3/7 for these items will indicate success.
Secondary Outcome:
  • Safety will be measured by the rate of adverse reactions to ICG dye as defined by the Ottawa Thoracic Morbidity and Mortality classification
  • Safety will also be measured by the rate of perioperative complications as defined by the Ottawa Thoracic Morbidity and Mortality classification
  • Anatomical accuracy will be evaluated using items 4, 5, and 6 of the Indocyanine Green Segmentectomy 7-Item Binary Scale. A score of 3/7 on these items will indicate success of anatomical accuracy
  • Added value of ICG-guidance will be evaluated using Item 7 of the 7-item binary rating scale. A score of 1/7 will indicate added value of ICG-guidance
  • Overall success of the intervention will be evaluated using Items 1-7 of the binary rating scale, only an aggregate score of 7/7 will be considered a success
  • Reproducibility and validity of the procedure will be measured by the rate of overall success
  • Partial success of the intervention will be measured by scores between 1/5 and 4/5 on the 7-item binary scale
  • Length of time of the procedure will be measured by collecting the procedure start and procedure start time
  • Length of time of the operation will be measured by collecting the time the patient entered the operating room until the time the patient left the operating room
  • Rate of conversions to lobectomy will be measured by collecting the proportion of conversions to lobectomy or thoracotomy
  • Rate of conversion to thoracotomy will be measured by collecting the proportion of conversions to thoracotomy
  • Duration the patient had chest tubes in situ will be measured by collecting the date of surgery and the date the chest tube was removed
  • Duration of hospital length of stay will be measured by collecting the data of admission and the date of discharge

View this trial on ClinicalTrials.gov

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Resources

Canadian Cancer Society

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