Exercise to Prevent AnthraCycline-based Cardio-Toxicity Study

Official Title

Exercise to Prevent AnthraCycline-based Cardio-Toxicity Study (EXACT)

Summary:

As the numbers of cancer survivors grow, the long-term adverse effects of cancer therapy are becoming increasingly apparent. Most prominent are the toxic effects on the heart (cardiotoxicity) which may lead to cardiac dysfunction and increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The investigators hypothesize that an individualized aerobic training program for cancer patients receiving active treatment will be both feasible and safe and will result in improvements in overall levels of physical activity and quality of life. Feasibility will be assessed by evaluating the recruitment, adherence and attrition rates, along with program safety. Efficacy will be assessed by evaluating changes in health-related outcomes.

Trial Description

Primary Outcome:

  • Feasibility as measured by rate of recruitment
  • Number of adverse events
Secondary Outcome:
  • Feasibility as measured by program adherence
  • Feasibility as measured by attrition rate
  • Cardiac Function
  • Cardiac Disease Risk
  • Aerobic Fitness
  • Fatigue
  • Physical Activity Behaviours
  • Quality of Life
  • Lipid Profile
  • Fasting Glucose
  • High-sensitivity Troponin (hs-TNT)
  • N-terminal of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP)
  • C-reactive protein (CRP)
  • Cytokines (IL-1α)
  • Cytokines (IL-1β)
  • Cytokines (IL-4)
  • Cytokines (IL-6)
  • Cytokines (IL-10)
  • Cytokines (IL-17)
  • Cytokines (TNFα)
As the numbers of cancer survivors grow, the long-term adverse effects of cancer therapy are becoming increasingly apparent. Most prominent are the toxic effects on the heart (cardiotoxicity) which may lead to cardiac dysfunction and increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Of note, data indicate that the magnitude of CVD risk for long-term survivors may exceed the risk of a secondary malignancy, which is a known complication of primary cancer therapy. While long-term follow-up data in adult cancer survivors is lacking, study of adult survivors of childhood cancers shows that these individuals are 15 times more likely to develop congestive heart failure (CHF), 10 times more likely to develop CVD, and 9 times more likely to suffer a stroke compared individuals who have not had cancer. Thus, it is clear that the long-term cardiotoxic effects of cancer therapy represent a significant concern for cancer survivors. The mechanisms responsible for the damaging effects of cancer therapy are not fully understood, however there is a need to maximize the benefits of treatment while minimizing long-term damage. Recent animal studies suggest that aerobic exercise training may offer a protective effect against chemotherapy-induced heart disease. However, to the investigator's knowledge, no study to date has examined the potential cardioprotective benefits of exercise training for patients receiving cancer treatment. Accordingly, the purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a 12-week supervised exercise program based on the principles of cardiac rehabilitation for patients receiving anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Feasibility will be assessed by evaluating three outcomes, recruitment rate, adherence rate (i.e. exercise class attendance records), attrition rate, and safety (i.e. number of adverse events). Efficacy will be assessed by evaluating changes in health-related outcomes to assess if these changes are equal to or better than what was measured at baseline. The health-related outcomes include cardiac function and biological markers of cardiotoxicity.

View this trial on ClinicalTrials.gov

Interested in this trial?

Print this page and take it to your doctor to discuss your eligibilty and treatment options. Only your doctor can refer you to a clinical trial.

Resources

Canadian Cancer Society

These resources are provided in partnership with the Canadian Cancer Society