Chemotherapy and Pelvic Radiation Therapy With or Without Additional Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Early-Stage Cervical Cancer After Radical Hysterectomy

Official Title

Phase III Randomized Study of Concurrent Chemotherapy and Pelvic Radiation Therapy With or Without Adjuvant Chemotherapy in High-Risk Patients With Early-Stage Cervical Carcinoma Following Radical Hysterectomy

Summary:

RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumour cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumour cells. It is not yet known whether chemotherapy and radiation therapy are more effective when given with or without additional chemotherapy in treating cervical cancer. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying chemotherapy and pelvic radiation therapy to see how well they work when given with or without additional chemotherapy in treating patients with high-risk early-stage cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy.

Trial Description

Primary Outcome:

  • Disease-free survival
Secondary Outcome:
  • Overall survival
  • Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy as measured by FACT-GOG/NTX4
  • Quality of life as measured by FACT-Cx and FACIT-D
OBJECTIVES:
Primary
  • To determine if administering adjuvant systemic chemotherapy after chemoradiotherapy will improve disease-free survival compared to chemoradiotherapy alone in patients with high-risk early-stage cervical carcinoma found to have positive nodes and/or positive parametria after radical hysterectomy. Secondary
  • To evaluate adverse events.
  • To evaluate overall survival.
  • To evaluate quality of life.
  • To evaluate chemotherapy-induced neuropathy.
  • To perform a post-hoc dose-volume evaluation between patients treated with standard radiation therapy and patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with respect to toxicity and local control.
  • To collect fixed tissue samples to identify tumour molecular signatures that may be associated with patient outcomes, such as adverse events, disease-free survival, and overall survival.
  • To collect blood samples to identify secreted factors from serum and plasma that may be associated with adverse events or outcome and to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes from buffy coat that may be associated with a genetic predisposition to tumour formation itself or a response to cytotoxic therapy.
OUTLINE:

This is a multicentre study. Patients are stratified according to planned use of brachytherapy (no vs. yes), radiation therapy modality
  • [standard external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)], and radiation therapy dose (45 Gy vs. 50.4 Gy). Patients are randomized to 1 of 2 treatment arms.
  • Arm I: Patients undergo standard EBRT or IMRT to the pelvis once daily 5 days a week for 5-6 weeks. Patients also receive concurrent cisplatin IV over 1 hour once weekly for 6 weeks. NOTE: Some patients may also undergo brachytherapy beginning within 7 days after completion of radiation therapy.
  • Arm II: Patients receive chemoradiotherapy as in arm I. Beginning 4-6 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy, patients receive paclitaxel IV over 3 hours and carboplatin IV over 30 minutes on day 1. Treatment repeats every 21 days for 4 courses in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Quality of life is assessed by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy
  • Gynecologic Oncology Group (FACT-GOG/NTX4), FACT-Cx, and FACIT-D questionnaires at baseline; at the completion of chemoradiotherapy; and then at 6, 12, and 24 months after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Blood and tissue samples may be collected for gene expression analysis by immuno-histochemistry (IHC) and for biomarker and polymorphism studies. After completion of study treatment, patients are followed up very 3 months for 2 years, every 6 months for 3 years, and then annually thereafter.

View this trial on ClinicalTrials.gov

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Resources

Canadian Cancer Society

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